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20 Surrey charities making a difference locally and internationally

PUBLISHED: 11:12 25 November 2013 | UPDATED: 12:45 02 May 2018

Surrey charities

Surrey charities

Archant

Home to everything from international wildlife foundations to local organisations making life a little easier for those in difficulty, Surrey can hold its head high for its charitable giving. Here we put 20 of our county’s top charities under the spotlight

Shooting Star CHASE

David Burland, Chief executive officer

Why was the charity founded?

Shooting Star CHASE began life as two separate charities before merging in April 2011. CHASE hospice care for children was founded in 1990 by Julia Lever. A community team began work in 1999 and Christopher’s Children’s Hospice was opened in 2001. The Shooting Star Trust, meanwhile, was founded in 1995 by Kathryn Turner and after years of capital fund-raising, Shooting Star House opened in August 2005.

How have things changed?

The charity now supports over 600 families across London, Surrey and West Sussex. We receive no guaranteed government support so each year we need to raise £8.5 million to provide our vital service to these families who rely on our support. Shooting Star CHASE now employs 200 staff and has more than 600 volunteers who help with a huge range of tasks including helping to run our seven charity shops.

Famous faces…

Shooting Star CHASE is lucky to have support from lots of fantastic celebrities including Tony Hadley, Joan Collins, Simon Cowell, Sir Cliff Richard, Michael Ball, Philip Glenister, Theo Paphitis and Phillip Schofield.

Not-to-be-missed events…

Shooting Star CHASE holds events throughout the year, including the star-studded Shooting Star CHASE Ball at the Dorchester, Afternoon Tea with Simon Cowell, The Hospice to Hospice Bike Ride, The Loseley Run and The Sunrise Walk. The charity also has a seven year association with Surrey Life magazine, co-hosting the Surrey Life Shooting Star CHASE Carol Concert every December. .

What does the future hold?

We are in a crucial and exciting chapter in our history. The number of families referred to us and subsequently accepted for on-going support increased by 20% in the last financial year and referrals are still rising. This is extremely positive because it means we’re continuing to support more families in need of the vital care we provide but to continue to meet this demand we need to open more beds. At present, we cannot afford to do this.

 

Queen Elizabeth’s Foundation for Disabled People

Jan Podsiadly, Head of communications

Why was the charity founded?

QEF was opened at Leatherhead Court in 1934 by Dame Georgiana Buller and surgeon Stanley Evans with the patronage of The Queen Mother, then HRH The Duchess of York. These visionary pioneers of social services recognised that disability should not be a barrier to employment.

How have things changed?

While QEF Vocational Services continues to prepare disabled people for employment and assist them getting a job, new services have been added over the years. QEF Neuro Rehabilitation Services in Banstead is a leader in acquired brain injury rehabilitation; QEF Independent Living Services in Leatherhead supports people with complex disabilities to acquire life skills and greater independence and QEF Mobility Services in Carshalton enables people to achieve independence outside their home. QEF has taken three local charities under its wing: MERU in Epsom provides bespoke and ready-made specialist equipment for disabled children, VASD provides mobility and living aids as well as wheelchair accessible holiday homes and even a canal boat, and Sutton Shopmobility allows people to shop independently.

Famous faces…

The most publicly known vice patrons include Sir Richard Stilgoe and Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen, as well as vice-presidents, Penelope Keith, Nicholas Witchell and Nicholas Owen

Not-to-be-missed events…

Our spring and autumn ladies lunches at Epsom Downs racecourse have been massively popular for more than 25 years, providing a host of celebrity guest speakers over the years.

What does the future hold?

QEF supporters have always been very generous with their gifts and time and, from the 16 trainees who attended on the first day, QEF now supports more than 4,000 disabled people. Next year, QEF will be 80 years old and we are very proud of what’s been achieved during this time.

 

The Children’s Trust

Maria Coyle, Press officer

Why was the charity founded?

After a battle to keep Tadworth Court Children’s Hospital open when it faced closure, The Children’s Trust gained charitable status in 1984. From 1927, the hospital was the country branch of Great Ormond Street, providing a retreat for children with respiratory difficulties. When NHS services felt the pinch 
and Tadworth’s future was compromised, the local community joined together in a national campaign, Save Tadworth. In 1984, the Department of Health transferred management to a newly created charity, The Children’s Trust.

How have things changed?

We are now the UK’s leading charity for children with a brain injury. We also have an onsite school for children with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD), which publishes its own curriculum used in special schools across the UK and internationally.

Famous faces...

We have had a host of famous personalities who’ve supported the charity over the years. Our vice-presidents today include newsreader Nicholas Owen, 
Top Gear’s Richard Hammond, TV presenter Phil Tufnell, music star Elaine Paige, business guru Jacqueline Gold and actress Amanda Burton.

Not-to-be-missed events…

Our Christmas Fair is always a big hit. It is held here at the Trust on Saturday November 23 from 12noon. Our national fund-raising initiatives include Humphrey’s Pyjama Week 
and National Doughnut Week.


What does the future hold?

We are kicking off our Pearl anniversary celebrations this year and have lots planned for 2014 to mark this special 30-year milestone.

 

David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation

David Shepherd, Founder

Why was the charity founded?

I founded DSWF in 1984 because I wanted to give something back to the animals that helped establish me as a wildlife artist.

How have things changed?

DSWF moved from a kitchen table at my home in Hascombe to a small unit in Cranleigh. Today, thanks to the generosity of a major donor, DSWF operates from an office above a smart gallery space in Shalford – the perfect place to promote our Art for Survival programme. We have only 12 staff and rely on our amazing volunteers but being lean on admin means we can ensure funds get to where they are needed most. The challenges facing the world’s most iconic animals – human population increase, habitat destruction and poaching – have changed little in the last 30 years but 2013 has been the worst on record for the illegal killing of elephants, rhino and tigers.

Famous faces...

Our honorary vice-presidents include David Gower, Gary Lineker and Simon King. The likes of Stephen Fry, Joanna Lumley and Sir Paul McCartney have supported our DSWF TigerTime Campaign, which aims to protect the world’s wild tiger populations.

Not-to-be-missed events…

Locally, our annual Christmas Fair takes place in Cranleigh on Saturday November 9 and the TigerTime team hosts their first comedy event at G Live in Guildford on Monday November 11, with supporters Marcus Brigstocke and Simon Evans.

What does the future hold?

2014 is the foundation’s 30th anniversary year. While celebrating the conservation successes of the last 30 years, our work will be focused on the conservation challenges of the next 30.

 

Challengers

Madeline Henderson, Head of communications

Why was the charity founded?

Challengers was founded in 1979 by paediatrician Dr Helen Foley and leisure centre manager Colin Hassell who recognised the lack of play and leisure opportunities for disabled children locally.

How have things changed?

The charity continues to expand in response to the huge demand for our play, youth and young adult schemes. We opened our second Play and Youth Centre in Farnham in 2008 and now operate a large number of pop-up schemes across Surrey and Hampshire. In total, we now support 1,400 disabled children and young people a year and have increased our delivery in the last five years by 73%!

Famous faces…

We have a number of famous patrons: Damon Hill was heavily involved in supporting our Farnham Play Centre; Matthew Kelly is guaranteed to bring huge amounts of fun to any event; Michael Buerk often speaks at events we hold; and Jenny Seagrove has just joined. Downton Abbey actress MyAnna Buring recently visited us and is speaking at a Black Tie evening in October; we can’t wait!

Not-to-be-missed events…

We hold an annual Battle of the Businesses quiz night for local companies in June and we also run a Business Club which holds quarterly events with high profile speakers at venues including Loseley Park and Fetcham Park.

What does the future hold?

Families often refer to Challengers as a ‘lifeline’ and while that demand is there we need to keep growing and support more disabled children and young people. 2014 will see our new Play Centre in Guildford opening, as well as Challengers’ 35th birthday. We look forward to celebrating!

 

The Lightbox

Marilyn Scott, Director

Why was the charity founded?

The concept of The Lightbox first began in 1993, when 70 local history and arts enthusiasts joined forces with the goal of creating a gallery and museum for Woking. Over the years, the idea grew in size, ambition and support. A partnership was secured with Woking Borough Council, who donated the site and provided funding towards development and construction. In addition, the council entered into a service contract with The Lightbox for 15 years. This meets 40% of the running costs of the charity. The other 60% of our income derives from fund-raising, the café, shop and corporate hire of the building.

How have things changed?

Since employing the first staff in 1997, The Lightbox has developed a nationally recognised, award-winning education and outreach service. After gaining further support from the Heritage Lottery Fund in 2004, Arts Council England, along with many other companies, charitable trusts and individuals, construction was able to begin in 2005. The new building, designed by the architects of the London Eye, Marks Barfield, was officially opened in September 2007.

Famous faces...

We have been privileged to welcome Grayson Perry on many occasions and Sir David Attenborough has lectured twice at fund-raising events. Local personalities like Paul Weller have also given support.

Not-to-be-missed events…

The Lightbox holds an annual Arts and Craft Fair at the end of November.

What does the future hold?

We want to carry on expanding our programme and reaching even more people. Coming up next year, we have major exhibitions including Renoir in Britain and The Horse at War.

 

The Orpheus Centre

Jo Bega, Head of development

Why was the charity founded?

In the mid-1990’s, songwriter Sir Richard Stilgoe and neurologist Dr Michael Swallow started piloting music weeks for disabled people. These were so effective that Sir Richard decided to start a place where disabled people and students could work together for longer. The Orpheus Centre opened in 1998 at Sir Richard’s former family home in Godstone.

How have things changed?

The charity started with five disabled students, who learnt to cook, manage budgets, do laundry and go shopping, while also writing songs, devising dances and challenging ideas about disabled people whenever they performed. Fifteen years later and Orpheus has 26 full-time students living in independent flats, as well as around 20 day students.

Famous faces…

Celebrity supporters include Joanna Lumley, Dame Judi Dench, Chris Tarrant, Matt Lucas, Ronnie Corbett, Sir Tim Rice and Lord Lloyd Webber.

Not-to-be-missed events…

Every year, our students devise and perform a sell-out Christmas show, as well as a large summer production at a London theatre. We also hold a mid-summer fund-raising gala.

What does the future hold?

Our motto is Never Look Back. As we look to the future, we hope to offer our unique service to as many young disabled adults as possible and help them build a future through the performing arts.

 

Momentum

Natalie Harvey, Fund-raiser

Why was the charity founded?

Momentum was founded in 2004 by Bianca Effemey and two parents who had children with cancer. They knew that when a child is diagnosed, as a parent you feel utterly helpless and isolated. Your family is plunged into a complete state of fear and anxiety and the lives of all involved are turned upside down. Momentum offers immediate support and advice from people who really understand what the family is going through.

How have things changed?

In the last 10 years, Momentum has raised over £350,000 for projects in the paediatric department at Kingston Hospital. The charity is now working with St George’s Hospital in Tooting and plans to work with other local hospitals too. Momentum has also raised £200,000 to buy two holiday homes in the New Forest to send families away on much-needed breaks.

Famous faces...

Our patrons include author Dame Jacqueline Wilson, actor Philip Glenister, former Australian rugby union international Michael Lynagh and actress Kim Ismay.

Not-to-be-missed events…

In 2014, we will be holding our 10th anniversary fund-raiser at The Brewery in the City, which has hosted the BAFTAs. This will be a black-tie dinner for approximately 300 guests. The centrepiece of the evening will be a one-off Las Vegas themed show, featuring stars of West End productions and dancers from the famous Urdang Academy.

What does the future hold?

We will continue working with Kingston Hospital at the heart of our fund-raising area but would also like to raise funds to enhance the healing environment for sick children in other hospitals.

 

The National Gardens Scheme

Chris Morley, Marketing communications manager

Why was the charity founded?

The National Gardens Scheme was founded in 1927. The charity was started by the Queen’s Nursing Institute with the intention of it being a one-off fund-raising activity. It was so successful that 87 years on we are still going strong. In part, the funds were to be used to help financially support district nurses during retirement in recognition of the fantastic work those nurses had played in the early 20th century in improving the health of the population. In 1932, the scheme published a guide book of all the gardens that were opening for it that year. Over time, this guide book became known as The Yellow Book (because of its distinctive cover).

How have things changed?

In 1927, there were just over 600 gardens that opened for the scheme. In 2014, the number will be close to 4,000. However, we remain true to our founding mission in so much that the majority of the money that we raise is distributed to other charities such as Macmillan Cancer Support, Marie Curie Cancer Care, Help the Hospices and the Carers Trust, which have nursing and caring at the heart of what they do. We also support a number of charities that have a gardening connection such as Perennial.

Famous faces…

Our president is Joe Swift, who is a presenter on BBC Gardeners’ World and a Gold Medal winning designer at the Chelsea Flower Show

Not-to-be-missed events…

During the course of 2014, there will be hundreds of gardens across Surrey that will be opened by their owners to raise money for the charities that we help support. Look out for The Yellow Book!

What does the future hold?

After the dual impact of the weather and other events (The Jubilee and the Olympic Games) on the amount of income we were able to raise in 2012, this year I’m pleased to say has been much better. We hope then that this continues into 2014 and we will be able to donate close to £3 million to charity.

 

Halow

Damon Hill, Co-founder

Why was the 
charity founded?

The inspiration for halow came from a group of parents’ children – Harriet, Amber, Laura, Oliver and William – each having a learning disability. We came together at the beginning of 2006, concerned with the prospect for our children’s future and others like them. Passionate that these young people should lead positive and happy lives, near their own friends and families in Surrey, we established halow.

How have things changed?

Originally, the project was focussed on just the original five young people. Now halow supports over 170 in and around Surrey.

Famous faces...

Celebrity chef Heston Blumenthal joined us to race at our annual karting challenge.

Not-to-be-missed events…

The aforementioned karting challenge at Daytona Sandown Park, Esher, is attended by many celebrities from the worlds of motorsport and TV – and, of course, Surrey Life had a team this year too..

What does the future hold?

Our new initiative, A Reason To Get Up, offers meaningful daytime activity for young people. Activities include learning about electricity and making lights from recycled/recyclable materials. It is hoped that this may become a social enterprise in the future.

 

Phyllis Tuckwell Hospice

Sarah Brocklebank, Chief executive officer

Why was the charity founded?

Phyllis Tuckwell was a local mother of three who was diagnosed with cancer in 1949. Following her death in 1970, her husband and eminent surgeon Sir Edward Tuckwell and former patient Yvonne Dale were determined to create a modern hospice to provide greater choice for terminally ill patients and specialist services to help them and their families. The hospice opened in 1979 and today serves West Surrey and part of North East Hampshire.

How have things changed?

On the day the hospice first opened, there were just two patients. Today, thanks to 200 staff and over 700 volunteers, we support and care for over 140 patients, carers and relatives every day. With the expansion of our Hospice Care at Home service, our care is now provided at the hospice, in the community and in patients’ own homes. Seventy five per cent of our care is actually provided outside of our In-Patient Unit.

Famous faces…

Unfortunately not, but we’d love the support of a famous personality.

Not-to-be-missed events…

Light up a Life is an annual service of remembrance and thanksgiving where we illuminate the lights on our Christmas tree – each one dedicated to a loved one who is no longer with us. Every Christmas, we also hold a Santa & Rudolph Fun Run. This is a fun family run with adults wearing Santa suits and children wearing antlers and flashing noses. This year, we are holding it at the Devil’s Punch Bowl.

What does the future hold?

Next year we celebrate our 35th anniversary and are expanding our day hospice to create more space.

 

The Royal Marsden Cancer Charity

Amanda Heaton, Community and corporate fund-raising manager

Why was the charity founded?

The Royal Marsden Cancer Charity was set up 10 years ago to support The Royal Marsden by funding key projects that would improve our patient facilities to above the NHS standard.

How have things changed?

Today, the charity helps The Royal Marsden provide world-class diagnosis, treatment and care for cancer patients and supports the hospital’s pioneering work in cancer research. As Europe’s leading cancer centre, our work improves the lives of cancer patients worldwide.

Famous faces…

Prince William is president of The Royal Marsden and has helped support the work of the charity through this role. He and Kate opened our charity-funded Oak Centre for Children and Young People shortly after their wedding. One of our most recent high profile patients, tennis player Ross Hutchins, organised a charity tournament earlier this year at Queen’s with his good friend Andy Murray.

Not-to-be-missed events…

Every year thousands take part in our 14-mile sponsored walk, The Marsden March. Supporters, patients and staff start at our Chelsea hospital and finish in Sutton.

What does the future hold?

Since the charity started, we have raised £100 million and helped improve the lives of many cancer patients in the UK and worldwide. We hope to raise another £100 million in the next decade to continue this important work.

 

Rainbow Trust Children’s Charity

Christina Cahill, Family support manager

Why was the charity founded?

Rainbow Trust was founded in 1986, when Bernadette Cleary from Leatherhead was a friend to a neighbour in need. Twelve-year-old Rachel had terminal cancer and wanted to die at home. Bernadette worked tirelessly to persuade consultants and the family’s GP that Rachel should have her wish and die peacefully at home. News of Bernadette’s help quickly spread and so Rainbow Trust set out to be a lifeline for parents, brothers and sisters who are struggling because someone they love is seriously ill or dying.

How have things changed?

Our founder started Rainbow Trust from a shed in her back garden with just one other person. Rainbow Trust now supports 1,400 families across England, employs 82 people and has nine offices across the country.

Famous faces…

The Hon Richard Stanley is our president and our celebrity patrons include Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes, former rugby star Austin Healey and presenter Mary Nightingale.

Not-to-be-missed events…

Our annual Carol Concert on the first Thursday of every December is held in the beautiful St Paul’s Church in Knightsbridge. We also have our annual Trust in Fashion event, which takes place at The Savoy on Monday March 10, 2014.

What does the future hold?

Our goals include expanding our volunteering programme, opening more care teams across the country and developing specialist care services like supporting siblings. We receive almost no government funding so working with our supporters will be increasingly vital if we are to reach more families.

 

Princess Alice Hospice

Nigel Seymour, Director of fund-raising and communications

Why was the charity founded?

PAH was founded in 1980 by Geoffrey Gardener, with the help of Edwin and Kathleen Stevens. The fund-raising appeal was launched by then Mayor of Elmbridge, Virginia Waller, supported by local Friends of Princess Alice Hospice committees.

How have things changed?

In the mid 1980’s, we had 300 to 400 admissions a year with less than 100 patients being cared for in the community at any one time. We now care for over 2,500 patients, their families and carers every year, and nearly 800 patients at any one time receive our care at home. The cost to provide our care, free of charge, to the local community has increased to over £8 million a year, 75% of which is funded by the local community with the remainder coming from the NHS.

Famous faces…

Our charity patrons are the broadcasters Michael Aspel and Chris Tarrant, and Baroness Ilora Finlay, doctor and member of the House of Lords.

Not-to-be-missed events…

Our Premiere Party takes place on Saturday November 23 and is a great night out for up to 900 people. This year, the theme is Stars of the Silver Screen with tickets priced at £38 and available on 01372 461808. We also hold Santa Fun Runs, which are coming up at the start of December.

What does the future hold?

We are about to undertake a six-month project to redevelop our reception, coffee shop and dining areas making them more accessible to patients, their families and hospice visitors.

 

Surrey Care Trust

Jennifer Britt, Fund-raising and communications officer

Why was the charity founded?

In 1982, a concerned group of people, including several Surrey magistrates, set up the Surrey Care Trust to give crisis grants to local people facing hardship.

How have things changed?

Our mission is the same as ever – to support local people facing disadvantage – but our work has expanded greatly with the main emphasis today on helping people to help themselves through improving their skills. A major part of our work is with young people who have had a troubled time in school and often a difficult start in life but we run education, training and mentoring programmes for people of all ages. Our most distinctive resources are our Swingbridge Community Boats – outdoor classrooms on the River Wey, Basingstoke Canal and Thames.

Famous faces…

Sir Richard Stilgoe has a long association with SCT and is now a patron. Another patron, Roger Black, will be leading the warm-up for our Santa Dash in Guildford on Saturday December 7.

Not-to-be-missed events…

Our Surrey 3 Peaks marathon walk through the Surrey Hills is a major fund-raiser for us. The date for 2014 is Saturday September 27. Next up is our autumn glam event, Let’s Get This Party Started, at the Radisson Blu Edwardian in Guildford on Friday November 29.

What does the future hold?

We will continue to work hard to help as many people as effectively as we can and paddling furiously to raise the funds to support that work. A major donation has enabled us to re-launch our Restart mentoring programme supporting people coming out of prison and ex-offenders.

 

Kent, Surrey & Sussex Air Ambulance

Stu Plumbley, Critical care paramedic

Why was the charity founded?

Surrey Air Ambulance was launched from Dunsfold Park near Cranleigh in June 2007, following a fund-raising appeal backed by actress Penelope Keith. Its mission is to relieve the sick and injured people living, working and travelling in the counties of south east England by providing a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS).

How have things changed?

In October 2012, the Surrey helicopter re-located to Redhill Aerodrome in preparation for night flying and in February a blood transfusion service was launched so that patients can be given blood at the scene. The Air Ambulance previously operated during daylight hours only but in May a 24-hour service was launched with crew responding by car at night. In June, we got our first helicopter that is fully capable of night flying.

Famous faces…

Air Ambulance Association patron David Jason, Penelope Keith, Julie Walters, Bernard Cribbins, Davina McCall and Shaun Williamson.

Not-to-be-missed events…

The Double 100 Cycle Challenge is an annual 100-mile or 100km bike ride, usually held in June or July, that takes in all counties covered by both helicopters. Runners are needed for the Brighton Marathon in April.

What does the future hold?

Trauma is no respecter of time and life-threatening accidents and medical emergencies happen at all times, which is why the Air Ambulance is preparing for night flying. A change in aviation regulations now allows air ambulances to fly at night and our 24-hour service will develop over a two-year trial period.

 

Surrey Wildlife Trust

Carys Hudson, Communications manager

Why was the charity founded?

On March 21, 1959, a provisional committee launched The Surrey Naturalists’ Trust at a meeting in Surrey County Council’s council chamber.

How have things changed?

In April 1960, Trust membership totalled 155. Since then, the Trust has grown many times over, issuing more than 15,500 invitations for its latest Annual General Meeting. After 54 years, many things, not least the Trust’s name, have changed. But the motivation that inspired the founders is still fundamental to all the Trust’s activities today. The Trust has been at its Pirbright headquarters since 1984, currently has 120 staff and continues with its mission ‘for a living landscape in Surrey that is rich in wildlife and valued by all’.

Famous faces…

The Trust marked its silver jubilee in 1984 by appointing naturalist David Bellamy as its president. In the celebratory newsletter he wrote: “Thursley Bog, now part of a National Nature Reserve, is of course very dear both to my feet and to my heart. It was on Thors Stone that I became engaged to be married and 1984 is our 25th wedding anniversary too!”

Not-to-be-missed events…

Our annual BioBlitz event is not to be missed. It’s a great opportunity for people of all ages to take part in wildlife surveys and see the wildlife close-up. We also hold a variety of events each month, some of which are listed in Surrey Life each issue.

What does the future hold?

We are focusing on targeted scientific research, exemplary management of land, and inspirational education and engagement of people. Our aim is to work in partnership to develop true ‘Living Landscapes’ across Surrey, where people and wildlife live in balance.

 

Wildlife Aid Foundation

Simon Cowell, Founder and chief executive

Why was the charity founded?

I set up Wildlife Aid in 1980 to rescue, care for and rehabilitate sick, injured and orphaned wild animals, and thereby in a small way redress the imbalance between man and nature.

How have things changed?

Having started as a small back-garden hobby, we are now one of the largest and most sophisticated wildlife centres in Europe, with a fully-equipped veterinary hospital. We are busy saving wild animals 24/7 thanks to our 300 plus volunteers who work in shifts to keep us going round-the-clock. Altogether we deal with over 20,000 wildlife emergencies every year – which is a huge task! We also have an active educational programme, promoting respect for nature and compassion for animals, and Surrey Life readers may be familiar with our work from the long-running Wildlife SOS TV series and Wildlife SOS Online.

Famous faces…

Our patrons include Ricky Gervais, Virginia McKenna, Julie Walters, Chris Tarrant and Jenny Seagrove.

Not-to-be-missed events…

We hold an annual Open Day at our wildlife hospital in Leatherhead and we get thousands of visitors through the door on that day. It’s the only time in the entire year that we have visitors, as we don’t like to disrupt or disturb our wildlife patients. It’s important though to give our supporters and members of the public a chance to see what goes on behind the scenes.

What does the future hold?

We’ve been going for 33 years and would like to have a new, much larger, site for our hospital, so that we can conduct veterinary research and more educational and media work. Education is the key. Rest assured that whatever it takes there will still be a Wildlife Aid Foundation in Surrey in another three decades time, working to give wildlife a second chance.

 

WWF-UK

David Nussbaum, Chief executive officer

Why was the charity founded?

WWF was launched in 1961 to conserve wild species and their habitats. Founding members included ornithologist Sir Peter Scott, biologist Julian Huxley and environmentalist Max Nicholson. The charity’s headquarters has been based in Surrey since 1981.

How have things changed?

With the support of the UK public, we’ve grown to become a leading environmental charity. Our mission has broadened to reflect the fact that, in order to safeguard the natural world, we need to address the wider implications of human activities on the environment, like our use of natural resources, and climate change. And the international WWF network is now a truly global organisation, working in over 100 countries.

Famous faces…

WWF is fortunate to have had a number of 
high profile supporters throughout its history. The Prince of Wales is our president, and Sir David Attenborough has been involved with WWF since its founding. We also have an amazing group of ambassadors, ranging from former footballer Graeme Le Saux to Dragons’ Den star Deborah Meaden.

Not-to-be-missed events…

Every March, WWF’s Earth Hour brings people together around the globe to show their passion for our amazing planet, by turning their lights off for an hour. It’s a simple action, but it’s also fun; a good excuse to get together with friends, stargaze, enjoy candle-lit board games – whatever works!

What does the future hold?

WWF turned 50 in 2011, a time to celebrate past achievements as well as look to our future – after all, WWF’s mission is all about ensuring we have a world with a future in which people and nature thrive. We’ve just moved into our new sustainable HQ, the Living Planet Centre in Woking, from our previous base in Godalming. There, people can visit the WWF Experience, which brings our work to life and will open to the public this month.

 

Woking & Sam Beare Hospices

Lorraine Weedon, Marketing and communications manager

Why was the charity founded?

Woking Hospice was opened in December 1996 to provide palliative care and support for patients and their families living in central Surrey. The local Mayor at the time, Rhod Lofting, wanted to open a hospice in the local area and spent five years raising the funds to do so. Sam Beare Hospice, based within Weybridge Hospital, re-opened in August 2006 under the management of Woking Hospice and provides palliative care and support to the residents of north Surrey. Now known as Woking & Sam Beare Hospices, we serve the boroughs of Woking, Surrey Heath, Runnymede, Spelthorne and west Elmbridge.

How have things changed?

We’ve developed innovative new services over the past 17 years, such as our award-winning programmes for bereaved children and young people, TommyD, and Footsteps, which won a very rare second term of funding from BBC Children in Need.

Famous faces…

Supporters include Bobby Davro, Peter Jordan and Michael Aspel.

Not-to-be-missed events…

Our annual ladies only Midnight Walk takes place in June each year and is our largest fund-raising event, with over £100,000 raised each year.

What does the future hold?

The biggest challenge we face is accommodation, as treatments for long-term illnesses are more advanced and, whereas palliative care was only focussed on patients with cancer, we now support many more people with non-malignant advanced progressive diseases. Some of this demand will be met by more home-based care and we are looking at the best ways we can expand to accommodate the growing needs of the population.

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Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Having bloomed in Brighton’s restaurant scene over the past decade, The Chilli Pickle opened its second site in Guildford this summer

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Monday, November 12, 2018

Historic Royal Palaces and IMG have announced that Kylie Minogue is the first headliner confirmed for Hampton Court Palace Festival 2019. These will be her only London shows of summer 2019. Here’s how you can get tickets

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Monday, November 12, 2018

Enjoy this linear rail to ramble section of the Thames Down Link route taking the short train-ride from Box Hill & Westhumble to Ashtead before walking back

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Tuesday, November 6, 2018

It’s that time of year when our beautiful countryside is alight with the colours of autumn. Here, we pick out some of her favourite spots to enjoy the seasonal splendour – as well as some perfect places for a post-walk refresher

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Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Found on the stretch of the River Thames between Weybridge and East Molesey, Sunbury-on-Thames is blessed with a village feel where it meets the water. From antique hunts to the joys of river life, here are a few of our favourite reasons to visit

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Monday, November 5, 2018

Verity & Violet are Loui and Jess – a singing duo from Surrey who specialise in blending vintage classics with modern favourites. The two have achieved success in the capital, but are now hoping to attract an audience closer to home

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